Tag Archives: MS Access Query

Quick way to Import Multiple Excel Files into MS Access

Recently, I had requested a big size of sales/inventory data from one of our internal team. While the data was available at a reasonable level of detail, it was too big to come in one spreadsheet. So, the concerned data operator gave me the data in multiple spreadsheets (MS Excel) with each spreadsheet of significant file size running into 100s of MBs. When I went through the data, I realised I might have to add some helper columns to add some more details – but doing so in each and every spreadsheet was going to be too time consuming. So, I started thinking of importing these multiple files into a single table of MS Access, then run queries as per my needs. Quick way to Import Multiple Excel Files into MS Access

In this post, you’ll learn about this in-built Macro function in MS Access to import data known as “ImportExportSpreadsheet”.

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ReaderQuery : How to extract the last activity done with the client ?

In this post, you’ll learn to solve a specific query raised by one of our reader. The query is as follows:

ReaderQuery : How to extract the last activity done with the client ?

Lets see how to solve this..

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How to Select Top ‘n’ or Bottom ‘n’ records from a dataset?

In this post, you will learn how to create a query to extract Top ‘n’ or Bottom ‘n’ records from a particular dataset. There are  instances when you’ll need to extract top or bottom ‘n’ records within a particular group.  In order to do so, MS Access provides a nifty feature  ‘Return’ – Select Top 'n' or Bottom 'n' records from a dataset in MS Access that is used to extract the required Top or Bottom values. This feature is available under the Query setup in the Design Tab of the ribbon.

Select Top 'n' or Bottom 'n' records from a dataset in MS Access

So, lets get started with the actual scenarios……

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4 Additional Operators in MS Access that you can use [Operator Types 5 of 5]

In all the 4 previous posts on operators, you have seen some specific operators that can be used to perform certain specific actions. In addition to this, there are still a few additional operators provided by MS Access to assist you in your data analysis.

4 Additional Operators in MS Access

In this post, you’ll learn about these additional operators….

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2 Handy Concatenation Operators in MS Access [Operator Types 4 of 5]

Today, you’ll learn to use two very useful concatenation operators in MS Access. By definition, ‘Concatenation’ means linking of two things as in a series or chain. From MS Access standpoint, concatenation means joining/linking two strings together.

Concatenate

So, let’s see how you can use these operators to your benefit….

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6 Logical Operators in MS Access that you must know [Operator Types 3 of 5]

While doing any data analysis, you often encounter situations wherein you need to make use of Boolean logic. Now, Boolean logic involves operations on Truth values TRUE (1) and FALSE values (0) .
6 Logical Operators in MS Access that you must know

In simple words, you would be interested, at times, in knowing the output when one expression is true and(/or) second expression is also true. You can think of Boolean logic as a  simple way of comparing individual inputs and expressions. In order to make those comparisons, it uses what are called as operators aka “Logical Operators”.  Note that Boolean logic is a form of logic that reduces all values to either TRUE or FALSE.

In this post, you are going to learn about Logical Operators in MS Access. You will make use of logical operators to combine two expressions and return a value of “TRUE”, “FALSE”, or “NULL” depending on the Boolean value of the expression on which logical operation is being done.

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6 Comparison Operators in MS Access that you need to know about [Operator Types 2 of 5]

In this post you’ll learn how and when to use the comparison Operator. As the name suggests, comparison operator allows you to perform comparison between two operands.

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